Subject:  
Hannover
CL.III

Kit Used: Eduard 1/48

Review & model by:
Mark Huhtala
Pictures: R. Forys







History:  The German company Hannoversche Waggonfabbrik AG was a long time producer of horse wagons and railway cars.   At the outbreak of WWI, the German air ministry requested that they become a sub-contractor for the aviation industry.   Several of the projects they worked on included the Aviatik C.I, the Rumpler C.Ia, and the Halberstadt D.II.   When in early 1917, a new spec was issued for a new category of "CL" aircraft, Hannover figured that they had gained enough experience to produce their own prototype.   The "C" class was intended to act as an artillery spotter, or recon aircraft, however they were typically slow and sitting ducks for fighters, so the new "CL" class was designed to operate as escorts that were adequately armed to fight off attackers.




[The CL II and CL III carried a crew of two, a pilot and rear gunner.]



Type CL II:  The CL II carried a crew of two, a pilot and rear gunner.   It was powered by the 180hp Opel-Argus As III inline engine.   Maximum speed was 101 mph, with a ceiling of 24,600ft, and an endurance time of 3.5 hours.   The upper wing was placed close to the fuselage, providing the pilot with an excellent view forward and upward, and the lower wing was staggered, to give a good view forward and downwards.   It was a pretty conventional design, except for one unusual feature, this being a biplane tail unit, which was typically only found on multi-engined aircraft.   The idea here was limit the size of the tailplane, therefore giving the rear gunner a better field of fire.   It was armed with the standard German 7.92mm machine guns, with a single synchronized Spandau gun mounted in the forward fuselage, and a ring-mounted Parabellum for the gunner.




[It was powered by the 180hp Opel-Argus As III inline engine.]



Type CL III:  The Hannover CL III was a development of the CL II, having the same layout.   It was produced in response to criticism from crews in the field about a lack of lateral control at low altitudes.   The wingtips were modified, and the ailerons were changed incorporating overhanging balances, which helped fix the issue.   This modification was important because the role of the aircraft was changed to that of a ground attack fighter.   The performance was also improved by installing the 160hp Mercedes engine, which was lighter and although rated lower in horsepower, actually performed better, particularly at altitude.   Unfortunately, the Mercedes engine was required more urgently for single seat fighters, so the type reverted to the Argus engine, and in this configuration, was designated the CL.IIIa.   All other aspects of the new model seem to be similar to the CL.II.




[It was a pretty conventional design, except for having a biplane tail unit] [It was armed with the standard German 7.92mm machine guns, with a single synchronized Spandau gun mounted in the forward fuselage, and a ring-mounted Parabellum for the gunner.]



The Kit:   This is one of Eduard's earliest kits and is a true multi-media affair.   The main parts such as the fuselage, wings, and struts are injection molded plastic, while the interior and some small detail parts are photo etch.   Finally, the engine and exhaust are white metal.




[This is one of the more difficult kits that I have built.]



This is one of the more difficult kits that I have built.   I actually started this kit several years ago.   I first built up the interior, and painted it several shades of brown to simulate the wood the original was made from.   I next assembled the fuselage and painted it in the lozenge pattern camo, but I wasn't happy with the way the camo turned out, so I boxed up the kit, and started on another project.




[I used the kit-supplied decals for the lozenge camo on the wings and tail.]



Finding the kit again, I thought I would take another crack at it.   I stripped the paint off the fuselage, and repainted it and the center section of the wing with Model Master Napoleonic Violet, Floquil CNW Green, Pullman Green, and Engine Black for the camo.   Satisfied with the results, I continued with the build.   The biggest problem with the kit was the lack of locating pins.   The wing and tail surfaces are butt joints, so I drilled these areas and installed brass pins to strengthen the joints




[The fuselage and the center section of the wing were painted with Model Master Napoleonic Violet, Floquil CNW Green, Pullman Green, and Engine Black for the camo.] [The prop was painted Tamiya Light Tan, and the wood grain was done with a mixture of Raw Umber and Burnt Sienna artist oils, then sealed with Future, to give it a varnished look.]



I used the kit-supplied decals for the lozenge camo on the wings and tail.   The engine was painted with Model Master Steel Metalizer, and the exhaust was painted with Model Master Burnt Iron.  The prop was painted Tamiya Light Tan, and the wood grain was done with a mixture of Raw Umber and Burnt Sienna artist oils.   It was then sealed with Future floor finish, to give it a varnished look.



[After assembly was completed, the aircraft was rigged using EZ Line.]



Assembly was completed, and the aircraft was rigged using EZ Line.   If I were to build this kit again, I would replace the landing gear struts with ones made from brass.   With the weight of the white metal engine, it's a little wobbly on the landing gear.




[This is one of Eduard's earliest kits and is a true multi-media affair.]